Lurita Doan

Still, almost anyone who criticizes Obama and the Democrats’ failed policies is labeled as a “racist”. When Black Republicans, such as me, criticize the president’s failed policies, Democrats know that the “racist” moniker won’t work, so instead, we are attacked as “traitors to our race”, or the media tries to portray us as stupid or corrupt.

But if a president’s policies are bad, if they fail to achieve their objectives (such as Cash for Clunkers, Cash for Caulkers, green energy investment initiatives, the “summer of recovery” or the Stimulus) is it really “racist” to criticize the policy or to think that the American people deserve better—even if the policy is advocated by a Black man? Is it “racist” to criticize the president because he has failed to submit a viable budget to congress for the past four years, or just incompetence on the part of the president?

The president also seems to be a liar. According to Webster, a liar is “a person who tells lies”, who deliberately “makes an untrue statement with the intent to deceive; to create a false or misleading impression.”

Isn’t that exactly what Obama has done when he says: he didn’t really know or hear the Rev. Jeremiah Wright preach anti-American sentiments, or when he writes about events that are patently untrue in his autobiography, Dreams of My Father, or when Obama deliberately tells lies about Romney and Bain Capital, or when Obama deliberately lies about the debt ceiling, or when Obama tries to claim the attack on the U.S. embassy in Libya was not terrorism?

What about other Democrat leaders? Such as when Harry Reid claims that Mitt Romney didn’t pay his taxes? Or whenEric Holder says he knew nothing about Fast and Furious? Or when Elizabeth Warren claims she is part Native American so she can game a hiring system which is tilted in favor of quotas and minorities?

In the past three and a half years, Republicans have worn out the pages of the thesaurus looking for euphemisms for lying. Republican punditry, speeches and writings are chock full of alternatives: mislead, mischaracterize, misrepresent, untruth, misspeak, prevaricate, fabricate, story, taradiddle, fairy tale, inaccurate, falsehoods, dishonest, distortion, whopper, canard, deceit, stretching the truth.

Supposedly, according to Republican “strategists”, using the word “lie” is too direct, too brutal, too hostile and might coarsen the dialogue between political parties. Using the word “liar”, they contend, would lead to vicious attacks from the mainstream media and would cause Republicans to lose respect or votes or the moral high ground. But, I would hate to hear what these Republican pundits think is too coarse or too harsh, if they think that the attacks from Democrat leaders over the past few years have been friendly banter.

When did our country slip so far, fall so low, that we have become so handcuffed by political correctness that we are unable to call a thing by its true name? Socrates understood that watering down one’s language does not change the truth or make it more palatable, just more confusing.

Our founding fathers understood that too. Our founding fathers were some of the most courageous and least politically correct folks of their century (think Ben Franklin).

Their willingness to speak the truth as they saw it may be one of the reasons why they had the courage to attack tyranny and hypocrisy and hold up the flawed policies of a greedy and ignorant king for the world to see, and in doing so, lay the foundations for the greatest free government in the history of the world.

Republicans need to stop being cowed by rants of “racism” and they need to stop trying to find ways to soften the reality of Obama’s widespread and repeated deceptions.

Perhaps Wednesday’s debate might be a great place to start.


Lurita Doan

Lurita Alexis Doan is an African American conservative commentator who writes about issues affecting the federal government.