Linda Chavez

In a couple of days, Iran will inaugurate a new president, Hassan Rouhani, which has caused some to speculate that the country is entering a new era. Rouhani has become a favorite "moderate" with much of the Western media, with The New York Times gushing in a recent headline: "President-Elect Stirs Optimism in Iran and West." But such optimism defies history.

Rouhani is not a new figure on the Iranian scene. He has served at the highest levels of the Islamic regime for decades. For 16 years, he served as secretary of Iran's Supreme National Security Council, the chief body responsible for foreign policy and national security, and was deputy commander in chief of the regime's defense forces for three years prior to that.

In 2003, he became Iran's chief negotiator in nuclear talks with Britain, France and Germany aimed at curtailing Iran's uranium enrichment program. It was his role in those talks that gave rise to his "moderate" credentials. But the evidence suggests his main role was to try to dupe the West by playing for time.

In a speech to the Supreme Council, parts of which were published in 2005 in an Iranian publication, Rouhani claimed that Iran suspended activities on nuclear enrichment only in those facilities where they had no technical issues.

"While we were talking with the Europeans in Tehran, " he boasted, "we were installing equipment in parts of the facility in Isfahan, but we still had a long way to go to complete the project. In fact, by creating a calm environment, we were able to complete the work in Isfahan."

A new report by the Institute for Science and International Security suggests that Rouhani's plan worked. According to the study, Iran may achieve the "critical capability" to build a nuclear bomb by mid-2014.

A nuclear-armed Iran would make the world a far more dangerous place than it is today, regardless of who occupies the largely symbolic role of Iranian president. Iran already has announced its plans to install 3,000 advanced centrifuges, which are the essential element in creating enough fissile material to produce a bomb. Rouhani's assumption of power won't change this reality; indeed it may prove a distraction.

Linda Chavez

Linda Chavez is chairman of the Center for Equal Opportunity and author of Betrayal: How Union Bosses Shake Down Their Members and Corrupt American Politics .

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