Linda Chavez

Technology is making it easier to track and apprehend criminals in real time, but some civil libertarians worry that Fourth Amendment protections are being flouted in the process. Many new cell phones come equipped with tracking devices that can pinpoint the location of the phone to within 30 feet. The feature offers lots of possibilities both to users and law enforcement.

Some cell phone providers offer parents the option of setting up a virtual fence that notifies them when their child strays beyond a certain distance from home or another preset location. Other companies offer users the ability to be notified when friends are close by. And even the simplest phones now have enhanced 911 capability mandated by federal law, which can detect a caller's location within a broad area through triangulated radio signals sent to cell towers.

But does having a cell phone now place ordinary citizens at risk of Big Brother keeping tabs on them everywhere they go, violating the Fourth Amendment's guarantee against unreasonable searches? Apparently some judges think so.

In a highly unusual move, a federal judge in Texas not only refused to issue a warrant to the Drug Enforcement Administration that would have allowed access to tracking data on a suspected drug dealer's whereabouts, but decided to publish the opinion this week, as well. Now The Washington Post has taken up the cause, noting that several such requests have been turned down recently because the government does not have probable cause to gain access to the information.

The Fourth Amendment guarantees individuals have the right "to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures," and that "no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." But of course, the Framers had no idea when they wrote those words that ordinary Americans would one day willingly carry around devices that could track their every movement and provide that information to scores of individuals.

Many people already have signed up to have private companies track their cars with GPS systems. Others are thrilled that their friends can find them at the local mall by carrying phones equipped with an alert system that notifies them when callers in their loop are nearby. Parents love the "chaperone" kid-tracking system offered by some cell companies, even if their kids don't. When it comes to cell phones and other electronic devices, privacy seems to be the last thing on most users' minds. Still it is the government's ability to tap into this system that has civil libertarians concerned.


Linda Chavez

Linda Chavez is chairman of the Center for Equal Opportunity and author of Betrayal: How Union Bosses Shake Down Their Members and Corrupt American Politics .

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