Larry Elder

Because of the CBO's "great news," several Democrats either got off the fence or switched on Obamacare from a "no" vote to a "yes." Rep. Mark Schauer, D-Mich., for example, said: "I needed to see the bill and the Congressional Budget Office score. The bill fundamentally does what I hoped it would." Another House Democrat relieved by the CBO score was Rep. Bart Gordon, D-Tenn., who said: "I have consistently said I would not support any version of health care reform unless it brings down rising health care costs, improves access to affordable care and does it all without adding one nickel to the national deficit. I've now been presented with a bill that does all three."

But four years later, the CBO now says it can no longer stand by its 2010 projections. Roll Call, the publication that covers Congress, writes: "In its latest report on the law, the Congressional Budget Office said it is no longer possible to assess the overall fiscal impact of the law. That conclusion came as a surprise to some fiscal experts in Washington and is drawing concern. And without a clear picture of the law's overall financing, it could make it politically easier to continue delaying pieces of it, including revenue raisers, because any resulting cost increases might be hidden."

What?!

Again, how important was the 2010 CBO "score," delivered on the eve of the Obamacare vote? Vital. Critical. Indispensible. Roll Call reminds us, "For Democratic lawmakers who were hesitant to sign onto the sweeping 2010 healthcare law, one of the most powerful selling points (emphasis added) was that the Affordable Care Act would actually reduce the federal budget deficit, despite the additional costs of extending health insurance coverage to the uninsured."

To the pile of broken Obamacare promises, we now add another. It is not true if you like you doctor you can keep your doctor. It is not true that if you like your plan you can keep your plan. It will not save the average household $2,500. It will not bend the cost curve down. And now we know that Obamacare cannot promise, as advertised, to shrink the deficit.

So about Obamacare, Rep. Clyburn can now stop feeling "giddy." Most Americans never were.


Larry Elder

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com.