Larry Elder

"Today I drove through the area near my college and saw some things that were extremely rage-inducing.

I passed by this restaurant and I saw this black guy chilling with 4 hot white girls. He didn't even look good.

Then later on in the day I was shopping at Trader Joe's and saw an Indian guy with 2 above average White Girls!!!"

"What rage-inducing sights did you guys see today? Don't you just hate seeing these things when you go out? It just makes you want to quit life."

A murder victim's anguished father blamed "craven, irresponsible politicians and the NRA." This father, of course, is in deep pain. The desire to blame something or someone is understandable. And, yes, mental health care experts should advise us on warning signs and encourage us to be proactive in urging those who need help to get it.

But while the experts play Sigmund Freud, may we protect ourselves -- evening the odds a little in favor of the good guys? This spree lasted 10 minutes, and police counted nearly a dozen crime scenes.

Nearly 40 states allow people -- on a "shall issue" basis -- to carry a concealed weapon, something that might have minimized the Isla Vista carnage. But California is not a "shall issue" state.

California has some of the most stringent "gun control" laws in the country, including the elimination of the so-called "gun-show loophole" and limiting handgun purchases to one per month. All transactions require a background check -- even a private sale between two police officers. A new law requires "traceable micro-stamping" for all new semi-automatic handguns.

Still the NRA gets blamed -- not the gun-free zones, not the inability of citizens to protect themselves and certainly not the shooter. Blaming the NRA or "craven politicians" won't stop bad guys -- in this case, one filled with racial hatred -- from doing bad things. The old line still rings true: The best and most sure way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.


Larry Elder

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com.