Larry Elder

Since 1976, there have been 17 "shutdowns" -- not counting the latest -- for a total of 110 days. In 15 of these cases, Democrats controlled the House. Were the Dems "hostage takers," "terrorists" and "anarchists"?

The shutdown was about Obamacare. Teamsters head James Hoffa, an Obamacare supporter, wrote a letter to Obama in which he said that Obamacare threatened the 40-hour workweek. Warren Buffett agreed that Obamacare should be "scrapped," and he warned of our healthcare market becoming "less and less competitive." Did they criticize Obamacare "mostly because our President is black"?

Noth believes Republican/tea party opposition to Obama is rooted in racism. How many of his Hollywood homies back Obama because he is black? Did Noth tweet about fellow actor Samuel L. Jackson? Jackson explained why he supported the then-Senator from Illinois in 2008: "I voted for Barack because he was black. 'Cuz that's why other folks vote for other people -- because they look like them."

Since Noth is concerned about "racism," one wonders how he feels about a recent poll that asked Hispanic, black and whites this question: As between Hispanics, blacks and whites, which group is most racist? More Americans (37 percent) believe most blacks are racist, versus 15 percent saying most whites are racist and 17 percent believing Hispanics are racist. Even blacks consider blacks the most racist. Thirty-one percent of blacks, according to the poll, said blacks are the most racist, 24 percent said whites and 15 percent said Hispanics. Mr. Noth, does this mean that blacks' hostility toward President George W. Bush was "mostly because our President was white"?

Polls have long asked Americans if they would vote for a black person for president. In 1960, about 40 percent said yes. By 1980, 80 percent said yes. More recently, in a 2006 Times/Bloomberg poll, 97 percent said yes. But more Democrats (at 4 percent) than Republicans (at 3 percent) ruled out voting for a black candidate.

Reckless charges of racism are standard operating procedure for the Hollywood left. But the election and re-election of the first black president presents a challenge. When the evidence demonstrates the declining significance of race, how can leftists continue to complain about its alleged significance? Answer: expand the definition of "racism." At one time, hostility toward a race made one a racist. Today, mere opposition to a policy -- providing a black president is on the other side -- makes one not only a racist, but one in need of a "horsewhipping."


Larry Elder

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com.


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