Larry Elder
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A national network reporter, during an interview about about the government shutdown, actually told me: "Democrats believe government should do some things. Republicans don't believe government should be doing anything." Where had we heard that characterization of the GOP?

"'Anarchist'? Why in the world wouldn't I use the term anarchy?" said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., in a CNN interview. "That's what they are. They're anarchists. They don't believe in government -- at any level. ... They're anarchists, just like they were at the beginning of the 20th century. ... They're not blowing up buildings and they're not killing people. But they're throwing monkey wrenches in the wheels of government." That a reporter parroted the line almost verbatim explains why Obama and the Democrats believe they will win the PR battle over which party voters will blame for this partial government shutdown.

Well, forgive tea party Republicans, elected to stop Obamacare, for actually going to Washington D.C. to try to stop Obamacare. Politicians literally attempting to fulfill campaign promises. Imagine.

Ted Cruz, the brash new Republican senator from Texas, believes, as do many economists and most doctors, that Obamacare is a bad idea and will undermine, not improve, our healthcare system.

Cruz believes that America's fast-growing debt imperils the nation's future. The Congressional Budget Office thinks so, too. In a recent report, the CBO calls America's spending and borrowing levels "unsustainable":

"The gap between federal spending and revenues would widen steadily after 2015 under the assumptions of the extended baseline, CBO projects. By 2038, the deficit would be 6 1/2 percent of GDP ... and federal debt held by the public would reach 100 percent of GDP. ... With such large deficits, federal debt would be growing faster than GDP, a path that would ultimately be unsustainable."

Even President Barack Obama once used the very same term. "The long-term deficit and debt that we have accumulated," the President told a Rio Rancho, N.M., town hall crowd in 2009, "is unsustainable."

And many economists say America's true debt is higher than the often-cited $16 trillion. America's real debt -- including unfunded liabilities and entitlements like federal loan guarantees, deposit insurance, Medicare and Social Security obligations -- is closer to $70 trillion. To this, the Democrats want to add Obamacare, described by Forbes columnist Peter Ferrara as "the biggest single spending bill in world history."

Look at the shape of the other three major entitlement programs:

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Larry Elder

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com.