Larry Elder

Juanita Broaddrick, in 1999, appeared on "Dateline NBC" -- after the broadcast was repeatedly delayed -- and accused Bill Clinton of rape. Repeat, NBC aired an interview with a woman who accused Clinton, the Arkansas attorney general at the time, of not sexual harassment, not sexual assault but rape. But a recent PBS special, touted as a tough, warts-and-all documentary, failed to include any reference whatsoever to the rape allegation in four hours of programming. To date, only one national reporter, Sam Donaldson, even asked a question about it.

When Gennifer Flowers went public with their affair, Clinton surrogates called her a liar, dismissing her as a "saloon singer." Clinton denied it, only to admit it after years of insisting she lied. Surrogates called Monica Lewinsky "delusional" before Clinton admitted their affair, and that he lied about it under oath and to the nation.

Paula Jones, who alleged Clinton committed sexual harassment, was denounced by top aide James Carville: "Drag a hundred-dollar bill through a trailer park, you never know what you'll find." Clinton later paid Jones $850,000 to settle the sexual harassment lawsuit that Clinton had insisted lacked merit. Clinton also accused attorney Dolly Kyle Browning of lying when she claimed she'd had a long-standing affair with him.

Kathleen Willey, a former Clinton campaign aide, appeared on "60 Minutes" and accused Clinton of taking her hand and placing it on his genitalia. Incredibly, feminist attorney Gloria Steinem said even if one assumes Willey told the truth, Clinton's actions do not constitute sexual harassment because he stopped when Willey complained. "In other words," wrote Steinem, "President Clinton took 'no' for an answer."

After Limbaugh's comments, reporters rushed to ask House Speaker John Boehner to react. Did anyone bother asking Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., to react to less-than-female-friendly comments made by talk-show host Bill Maher?

Maher, of HBO's "Real Time," recently announced a $1 million donation to a pro-Obama super PAC. Maher's wealth, in addition to his show's platform, makes Maher a pretty substantial person of influence in the Democratic Party. Yet Maher, on more than one occasion, referred to former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin by the "c" word, called her a "dumb 't'-word" (think "twit" with a different vowel), and has called Palin and Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., "bimbos." Kirsten Powers, a former Democratic strategist, wrote: "(Maher) recently made a joke about Rick Santorum's wife using a vibrator. Imagine now the same joke during the 2008 primary with Michelle Obama's name in it, and tell me that he would still have a job."

We don't need to tell you. He wouldn't.


Larry Elder

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com.


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