Larry Elder

Pima County Sheriff Clarence Dupnik took time from gathering the facts about the Tucson, Ariz., shooting to denounce the "vitriolic rhetoric" that he claims played a role in the carnage. He insisted, without any evidence, that Democratic Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' support for ObamaCare helped trigger the shooter's wrath, resulting in six dead and 13 wounded, including Rep. Giffords, who was shot point-blank in the head.

"I think it's time as a country," said Dupnik, "that we ... do a little soul-searching, because I think it's the vitriolic rhetoric that we hear day in and day out from people in the radio business and some people in the TV business, and what we see on TV and how our youngsters are being raised, that this has not become the nice United States of America that most of us grew up in, and I think it's time that we do the soul-searching."

Would the "vitriolic rhetoric" requiring "soul-searching" include Dupnik's pronouncements that the popular Arizona immigration law is "stupid" and "disgusting" and "racist"?

Would the "vitriolic rhetoric" include former President Jimmy Carter's ugly assertion that "an overwhelming portion of the intensely demonstrated animosity toward President Barack Obama is based on the fact that he is a black man, that he's African-American"?

Would it include former Democratic National Chairman Howard Dean's description of the contest between Democrats and Republicans as "a struggle between good and evil -- and we're the good"?

Would it include Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's characterization of then-President George W. Bush as "a loser and a liar"?

Would it include Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow's denunciation of President Bush as "dangerously incompetent"?

Would it include the late Democratic Sen. Ted Kennedy's assertion that the Bush administration fabricated a case for war in Iraq, or, as Kennedy put it, "week after week after week, we were told lie after lie after lie"?

Would the "vitriolic rhetoric" include Democratic Rep. Charlie Rangel's referring to Bush as "our Bull Connor," the infamous Southern lawman who, in the 1960s, turned police dogs and water hoses on black civil rights protesters?

Would it include the declaration by Comedy Central's Jon Stewart -- a man astonishingly described as a modern Edward R. Murrow -- that former President Harry Truman was "a war criminal"?

Would it include then-presidential candidate Barack Obama's declaration made at a fundraiser that "if they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun"?


Larry Elder

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com.