Larry Elder

"The blacker you are, the worse it is for you. If you're mixed, you've got a shot. If you cater to what white America wants you to do and how they want you to look, you can survive. But if you want to be yourself, and try to do things that fit you, and your skin, nobody cares about that. At the end of the day, white America dominates and rules. And it's racist." Thus said successful (and dark-skinned) victicrat/singer Mary J. Blige.

Guess Ms. Blige didn't catch the Rose Bowl.

The thrilling game, won by Texas, 41-38, says a lot about the greatness of America.

During the game, cameras caught beaming Texas fans, many white -- cheering their squad on. Then the cameras cut away to the USC sideline, where former minority stars like Marcus Allen and Tony Munoz cheered for their team.

Vince Young, Texas' black quarterback, proved that with hard work, perseverance and loving support, one can overcome a troubled background. During the game, the camera cut away to shots of USC quarterback Matt Leinart's dad. No such shots for the Texas quarterback, who led a talented group of black and white players. Young's father abandoned the family when Vince turned 4, and his dad now serves a 16-year prison term for armed robbery. Vince's mother and grandmother and two older sisters raised him. Still, he got into trouble and ran for a time with a street gang called the Bloods. After Vince got arrested for brawling with another gang, his mother came to pick him up. After the tongue-lashing he received about not wasting his future, Young -- chastened and embarrassed -- determined to turn his life around and get serious about his future. He recently announced his intention to enter the NFL draft, where he will likely receive a multi-year, multimillion-dollar contract.

Had USC won the Rose Bowl, that would have given the Southern California team 35 victories in a row. The pursuit would match the brilliant record of Chuck Ealey. Who is Chuck Ealey?

Ealey, a black man raised in the Midwest, starred as a high school quarterback for his team at Portsmouth, Ohio, Notre Dame High School. Despite winning all 18 games he started as quarterback in high school, major college teams only expressed an interest in Ealey if Ealey agreed to switch positions. Ealey refused. He made it clear that when he played in college, he intended to play quarterback.

No major football college showed an interest, so Ealey ended up playing at the University of Toledo in 1968. Not exactly center ring, but at least he played quarterback. He won every game at Toledo as starting quarterback while going 35-and-0, and graduated with a degree in economics.


Larry Elder

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com.


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