Kyle Olson
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School officials in California’s Oxnard School District began scrambling when they realized one of their teachers, Stacie Halas, had a juicy side job: She was porn star “Tiffany Six,” known most notably for her role in “Big Sausage Pizza.”

The district fired her, but now Halas is suing to get her job back, with the help of a union-affiliated attorney. Unions frequently defend members who lose their job, no matter the reason, ethics and morals be damned.

Halas’ attorney, Richard Schwab, was interviewed by NBC 4:

“He … argued that although porn might not be a respected industry, it is a legal one. He says Halas did it because she needed the money, and now she's trying to do something different.”

According to an interview published by The Smoking Gun, Halas was starring in films while she was a teacher.

“In the behind-the-scenes clip, Halas, who used the stage name ‘Tiffany Six,’ is asked by the interviewer whether her film career was ‘risky.’ ‘It is risky, very risky for me. Cause I am a teacher,’ answered Halas, who was then working at a California public school (where she was employed prior to her Oxnard teaching post).

“When asked if she was worried about people learning of her explicit films, she answered, ‘A little bit.’ As for why she did the pornos, Halas answered, ‘Money, and it’s fun, it’s exciting.’”

“’When the man mentioned a teacher who got into trouble for engaging in sex acts with ‘young kids,’ Halas laughed, ‘Well, at least I didn’t do the students.’ She later added, ‘I have to say I’m not into the students, though. At least I don’t do that.’ After the interviewer remarked that the teacher deserved a trophy (and called one boy's parents “the biggest cockblockers on Earth” for reporting the abuse), Halas laughed heartily and said, ‘That’s awesome.’”

What a pathetic example for children. Shame on the Oxnard school district for its lax teacher quality standards.

But beyond the trashy details lies a critical question: Are Halas’ colleagues paying for her defense? After all, Schwab is listed as an attorney for the California Teachers Association, the state affiliate of the National Education Association.

Other evidence suggests he likely was sent in by the union.

The Torrence Teachers Association – an affiliate of the CTA – sent a letter to its members in 2010 calling Schwab “our attorney.” He was “appointed” to help with local union with layoff issues, it said.

Schwab was also carbon-copied on a 2009 letter from then-United Teachers Los Angeles president A.J. Duffy to then-Superintendent Ramon Cortines disputing district layoffs.

LAProgressive.com writer Leonard Isenberg wrote last year that the UTLA was paying Schwab’s firm $2,500 per case to help laid-off teachers.

So California teachers, do you know if your dues are paying to defend such garbage? Does having a teacher acting indifferent to students viewing her “work” increase your professionalism?
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Kyle Olson

Kyle is Founder and CEO of Education Action Group Foundation, a non-partisan non-profit organization with the goal of promoting sensible education reform and exposing those with a vested interest in maintaining the status quo.