Kevin McCullough

The girl holding the sign was wearing a ski mask. All around her were people chanting "today we march, tomorrow we vote." Up the street and around the corner from where she is, a group of boys are burning an American flag.

Is this a scene out of some bizarre new action film? No! It is a half million criminals demanding the right to break the law a bit more and to not be punished. And it's not on the street of some banana republic, its Los Angeles, Calif.

This last week has been a difficult one to stomach for many reasons. But the attitudes ignited by those who lawlessly and recklessly left school classrooms, crossed interstate highways, and burned American flags were just the tip of the iceberg.

This last week, the American people were reminded by the headlines that our unsecured borders are our biggest threat to our own safety. On Tuesday, we reported the successful attempt by government agents to smuggle nuclear materials across our borders. They successfully penetrated our border with more than enough raw materials to create two nuclear dirty bombs. Barely a word of this was seen on the nightly newscasts. And if they were able to get enough materials through for two nuclear weapons, how easy is it for people to cross the border with each of them carrying a backpack of never-yet-inspected goods? Those agents are now scheduled to testify before Sen. Norm Coleman's committee. Which is a good thing. Sen. Coleman is one of very few senators who seem to be taking our security issue seriously.

We also had to sit through the plethora of stories presented on the nightly newscasts that were designed to bring sympathy to those who have broken our laws and live here illegally. We in the MuscleHead Revolution make a big deal about this all the time, but "words mean things." I for one was offended to repeatedly hear those who whipped up the demonstrations this week referred to as "immigrant advocates." Yet it appeared in nearly every news story covering the events. They are not true advocates for real immigration and to label them as such defies honesty in their motives and grants them cover to allow them to continue their underground operations of human traffic.

This week, we also saw for the first time how much one sparsely populated state spends toward the services given to those who have no right to be here. Colorado is not a population, financial or cultural capital, yet even by their modest standards Colorado taxpayers will be coughing up an additional $ 1 billion dollars in aid. How long can a state like Colorado hemorrhage that kind of loss and not end up affecting services needed by citizens who have the right to expect services?

Then came the pictures. Flying the American flag in submission to the Mexican flag on taxpayer-funded public-school flagpoles seems to have become a new hobby.

Add to all this madness the fact that Arlen Specter and the Senate judiciary committee thought it was more important to provide continuing guest-worker status to those who have no right to be here, rather than to actually seal the border and the frustration only multiplied.

Chris Simcox of the Minutemen Civil Defense Corps told me this week that the Border Patrol has detained more than 700 persons of Middle Eastern origin in the last two years. Fifty of these persons had official ties to al-Qaida. And a reminder for those who have already forgotten – 9-11 took only 19 persons.

It was encouraging to finally see some good poll numbers on the matter by Wednesday of this last week. Seventy-five percent of the American public does not believe that our government is doing enough to secure the borders. Ninety percent of the American people deem the illegal immigrant crisis "serious," and 57 percent of the American people deem it "very serious."

The question is: Why doesn't the U.S. Senate?

And to those of you who still think that McCain-Kennedy and a guest-worker program is going to solve the whole problem, let me pose a simple question: Why do the lawmakers in Washington, D.C., believe that those who refused to obey the laws that were already on the books will do anything, or be in any way motivated to obey new laws that are written to accommodate their presence here?

It's an good question.

And I would like a good answer.