Ken Connor

In the face of this reality, the language of martyrdom is once again becoming relevant. Modern examples of those who are being persecuted by the state or popular culture for their fidelity to their faith include the owners of Chick-Fil-A and Hobby Lobby. Both entities have been blacklisted by the reigning "moral authorities." Both have paid the price for espousing their faith in the public square. Right now the price may just be public opprobrium, or in Hobby Lobby's case, fines. But as we allow government to burgeon, the price will undoubtedly get higher. As Strachen and Walker point out, look what happened in Nazi Germany. National Socialism grew and grew and gradually took control over every area of life. The church was timid and even complicit in the growth of oppressive statism and the persecution of "undesirables," and soon there was little resistance from the wider culture. Dietrich Bonhoeffer and leaders of The Confessing Church were some of the only ones brave enough to say "no," and ultimately paid the price of resistance with their lives.

In America today, our culture is quickly crumbling as traditional institutions are weakened and hollowed out from within. We need people of courage and conviction to speak truth to power. People who will challenge the prevailing orthodoxy and speak with a clear voice of resistance. People who will show the rest of society that there is another and better way. In short, we need the Church.

So the question to Christians across the country is, are we willing to speak up? Are we willing to resist, willing to speak truth to power? Will we refuse to render to Caesar that which is God's, or will we roll over and let government steamroll all we hold dear? Resist the urge to dismiss such questions as paranoid hyperbole. That mistake has been made before. Let us learn a lesson from history and prepare ourselves to stand as defenders of the faith in the face of an antagonistic and increasingly authoritarian cultural and governmental regime.


Ken Connor

Ken Connor is Chairman of the Center for a Just Society in Washington, DC.