Ken Connor

Another element at play is the popular feminist assumption that homemaking can never truly fulfill a woman at the deepest level. Sure, motherhood is a wonderful thing, and there can be enjoyable aspects to presiding over the home (especially if you happen to occupy a high rung on the socioeconomic ladder). At the end of the day, however, the truly empowered woman – the feminist who recognizes the overwhelming challenges that women have overcome in pursuit of equality – recognizes that a life devoted to serving others can never achieve the kind of personal actualization so critical in today's self-centered culture. Today's feminist rejects the notion that the preservation and advancement of society depends largely on the contributions that women make to their families. She ignores the overwhelming evidence that women's mass exodus from the home and the denial of their unique gender differences have helped contribute to the disintegration of the family and the breakdown of our culture.

The Biblical view of the woman who devotes herself to the welfare of her husband and children is very different from Rosen's and the feminists' view. Proverbs 31:10-31 reflects a profoundly high view of a woman's care for her household and family. Where Rosen and her feminist cohorts might see a naïve, subjugated Stepford Wife or the kind of spoiled, self-indulgent diva popularized by the "Real Housewives" reality series, the Proverbs woman's children and her husband rise up and call her blessed. Thank God for women who are willing to bear the burdens of the household and who recognize the inestimable value of the contributions they are making, even if the marketplace and doyens of mainstream feminism don't.


Ken Connor

Ken Connor is Chairman of the Center for a Just Society in Washington, DC.