Kathryn Lopez

These women stood together near the starting point of the march to let it be known that every unborn child is a precious human life, regardless of the circumstances of its conception. They are women nurturing our politics, challenging our expectations, calling us to attend to the humanity of every person, encouraging us to protect all innocent life and helping women and men to rise to the challenge of parenthood, be it through birth -- planned or unplanned -- or adoption.

"I'll always be a victim," Rebekah tells me. "I wasn't going to create another one." She became pregnant with her now 10-year-old son as a result of rape. She embodies courage.

In his remarks to the rally a few minutes later, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor told the crowd, spreading out from the stage in the far distance, that Washington stands on the shoulders of those gathered, many of them young people -- high school and college students -- who insist on being a pro-life generation that abolishes abortion. That's not a cruel threat to women's rights but a promise, a vow to work to make sure that love overflows and that no woman or man feels alone or abandoned or without the support necessary to embrace life. With the witness and labor of these gathered protesters, we are all made more humane.


Kathryn Lopez

Kathryn Jean Lopez, editor of National Review Online, writes a weekly column of conservative political and social commentary for Newspaper Enterprise Association.