Kathryn Lopez
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There's something of the legacy of Helen Gurley Brown, the founder of Cosmo who died at the age of 90 on Aug. 13, in the magazine's virgin; Brown was about maintaining an upper hand in relations with men. And yet despite her sexual pioneering, she herself was married to the same man for 51 years.

Cosmo's virgin is also an embodiment, however, of the widespread realization of sexual revolutionary values. She may not be having sex, but she's pilled up and pleasured, as if that's the universal standard for single women.

Here is where the Obama administration has stepped in to make sure no woman has reason to worry about responsibility and consequences, as it mandates employers to cover abortion-inducing drugs, sterilization and contraception, even if employers have moral objections to these things (read: puritanical hang-ups). The move, billed as basic women's health care, is an official institutionalization of the Cosmogenization of America. We're all Cosmo girls now.

The federal government may not have established this church, but it is an acolyte. Even the virgin has the faith. There's a whole new "adult" view of religious liberty here. It may still be your mother's Cosmo, but America has experienced the change.

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Kathryn Lopez

Kathryn Jean Lopez, editor of National Review Online, writes a weekly column of conservative political and social commentary for Newspaper Enterprise Association.