Jon Sanders

The targets of this menace in the Land of the First Amendment, however, are exactly those who are least likely to protest. As Alan Charles Kors and Harvey A. Silverglate pointed out nearly a decade ago in The Shadow University, their 1998 book on university speech codes, the academic proving ground of this threat to freedom: "Republicans, moderates, evangelicals, assimilationist blacks or Hispanics, and devout Catholics don’t occupy buildings or cause disruptions that will bring the media to campus." Unlike the "self-appointed militants" representing grievance groups, individuals – especially law-and-order types – are unlikely to protest, so they're more likely to have their rights trampled by the speech police, be they on campus on in Congress.

But with free speech already this deeply imperiled with these Democrats having held Congressional power for less than half a year, those who care for individual rights must protest now. If this Orwellian insurgency isn't beaten back quickly, imagine the chilled climate in a couple more years – especially if a like-minded enemy of free speech is placed in the White House. Our freedom of speech is secured by the Bill of Rights. Let's not forget that – nor let this current Congress erode it.


Jon Sanders

Jon Sanders is associate director of research at the John Locke Foundation in Raleigh, N.C.

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