Jonah Goldberg

Imagine how they'll feel when they're notified that their insurance premiums (and deductibles) are going up and their doctor is no longer available. On the very off chance that they won't know who to blame, all they'll need to do is turn on the TV, which will be blaring ads showing their Democratic congressman or senator parroting Obama's lie that Obamacare will save you money and that you can keep your insurance and your doctor if you like them.

Like the president himself, Obama's fans have an unshakable faith in his ability to move the electorate to his side. And while it's obviously true that he's been good at getting himself elected, he's inversely successful at getting anyone else elected, which is why Sens. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) and Kay Hagan (D-N.C.) chose not to appear with Obama during his recent visits to their states.

In 2009, retiring Arkansas Rep. Marion Berry presciently warned that Obamacare was setting up the Democrats for a huge defeat in the 2010 midterms, just like "Hillarycare" had led to a loss of 54 House seats. Obama scoffed at such concerns. According to Berry, the president told him, "Well, the big difference here and in '94 was you've got me." Republicans went on to win 63 House seats and six Senate seats. It was the largest swing in the House since 1938. So I guess the difference was him.

Again, it wasn't supposed to be like this. President Obama's election was supposed to be the start of a "new New Deal." With unstoppable majorities in both the House and Senate, Obama would lift the curtain on a new progressive era where our faith in government would be restored. Now, according to Gallup, the American people consider government itself to be the No. 1 problem facing the country.

Liberals are still convinced their vision is what America wants and needs and that Obama is the right man to give it to us. Assuming Republicans don't immolate themselves -- always a possibility -- that vision will receive yet another massive rebuke in November. The interesting question then will be whether liberals question the soundness of their faith or insist that the fault lies entirely with the false prophet who failed to deliver them to the promised land.


Jonah Goldberg

Jonah Goldberg is editor-at-large of National Review Online,and the author of the book The Tyranny of Clichés. You can reach him via Twitter @JonahNRO.
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