Jonah Goldberg

Next week, the president will give his first State of the Union address. If that seems strange, it's because it will be his third nationally televised address to a joint session of Congress. The only way the White House communications shop could cram more Obama down our throats would be if it required, as part of the health-care bill, that we have Obama-message receivers installed in our fillings. The arrogance runs deeper. Over and over, Obama says he's gotten all of the policies exactly right. Whenever Stephanopoulos asked him whether he did anything wrong, Obama responded that he had no choice but to tackle the "big problems." "Now, I could have said, well, we'll just do what's safe. We'll just take on those things that are completely noncontroversial." What nobility! What courage! What a crock. The question isn't, "Do you regret tackling these issues?" The question is, "Do you regret how you tackled these issues?" According to Obama, there was no other way than his way. And these ungrateful, confused, angry voters just don't understand that. That is, if they're really mad at him at all. Obama whines that Massachusetts voters are really blaming him for someone else's mistakes. Guess who? George Bush, of course. "Here's my assessment of not just the vote in Massachusetts, but the mood around the country: the same thing that swept Scott Brown into office swept me into office. People are angry, and they're frustrated. Not just because of what's happened in the last year or two years, but what's happened over the last eight years." White House spokesman Robert Gibbs tried to shovel the same stuff Wednesday, saying that the "anger and the frustration" that swept Brown to victory on Tuesday swept Obama to power a year ago. Except, wait a second. Obama was carried into office on the wings of the flying unicorns called "hope" and "change," not "anger" and "frustration." Besides, if voters are frustrated with the slow pace of reform, why did they just elect a guy promising to slow down Obama's agenda? Not only is the White House in denial that giving Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid control of domestic and economic policy wasn't what voters wanted in 2008, they're in denial that it isn't what voters want in 2010. Instead, the White House is going to play the populist card, attacking the banks they bailed out and the insurance companies they struck sweetheart deals with. The president who mocked Scott Brown's truck -- made by GM, a company Obama actually owns -- is now going to grab a pitchfork and join the mob at the White House gates. I don't know how they'll do it, but one thing's for sure: We'll get even more Obama.


Jonah Goldberg

Jonah Goldberg is editor-at-large of National Review Online,and the author of the forthcoming book The Tyranny of Clichés. You can reach him via Twitter @JonahNRO.
 
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