Jonah Goldberg

Well, ditto. Except I think the abominable circumstance is the Vesuvian eruption of nonsense belched forth from distempered liberals frustrated by their inability to win a public policy debate.

An "overwhelming proportion" of the vocal opposition to Obama stems from the "inherent feeling" that "an African-American should not be president," testifies the de facto voice of Southern self-loathing and pharisaical pomposity.

Really, President Carter? Based on what? Polls you've studied? Which ones? Or did you descend from the temple of the Carter Center, flee your enabling entourage of sycophants and canvass some neighborhoods yourself? How many people told you they don't think a black man should be president? One? Two? Zero? Or are you simply reading minds again?

The good news is that the race peddlers have undermined themselves. The notion that opposing skyrocketing deficits and socialized medicine is racist is met with eye rolls by the vast majority of Americans, who do not need Sharpton and Carter to tell them what is -- or is not -- in their own hearts.

And, in fairness, when it became clear that Carter had turned this "debate" from mere fraud to farce, it suddenly dawned on some Democrats, including those in the White House, that smearing millions of constituents and swing voters (many of whom voted for Obama) as racists isn't the best politics. So one cheer for those who objected to this idiocy too little and far too late.

But others just won't let go. Maureen Dowd of The New York Times hears Rep. Joe Wilson shout, "You lie!" And her instinctive response is: "fair or not, what I heard was an unspoken word in the air: You lie, boy!"

It's the "fair or not" that gives Dowd away. She admits to hearing racism whether or not it's warranted. That's called prejudice. And unlike Wilson's foolish outburst, Dowd's was carefully considered. Dowd, Carter and Sharpton can't grasp that conservatives are less hung up on race than they are and that we can get past Obama's skin color. "Some people just can't believe a black man is president and will never accept it," writes Dowd. She's right. She's one of them.


Jonah Goldberg

Jonah Goldberg is editor-at-large of National Review Online,and the author of the book The Tyranny of Clichés. You can reach him via Twitter @JonahNRO.
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