Jonah Goldberg
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Finally, Hillary Clinton is getting some moderately tough questions. More important: People are finally noticing that when she answers these questions, she follows the example of Yogi Berra, who once said, “If you come to a fork in the road, take it.” At the recent Democratic debate in Philadelphia, she was asked whether she supports New York Gov. Elliot Spitzer’s plan to give illegal immigrants driver’s licenses. Her response can be summarized as: “Yes, no, maybe, sorta, kinda; Hey, look over there!”

Before the press corps relapses into its coma and Clinton’s competitors go back to hiding from her shadow, let’s see if she can answer a few more questions.

After the Philadelphia debate, your campaign tried to explain away your lackluster performance by implying your male competitors were unfairly “piling on” because you’re a woman. Do you really think sexism is an issue here? Which of your Democratic opponents are the most sexist? Will you play this card with foreign leaders if you run into trouble as commander in chief?

You keep saying that Social Security has lost 14 years of solvency on President Bush’s watch. In 2000, your husband’s last year in office, the program’s trustees said it would be solvent until 2037. Now they say it will be solvent until 2041. As the most serious female candidate for president we’ve ever had, aren’t you setting a bad example by not being able to do math?

In the 1990s, the Clinton administration furiously denied the suggestion you were a “co-president.” Now you routinely suggest your tenure as first lady was presidential experience. So which was it? And why should your tenure in the Clinton administration count when the one thing you ran — health care reform — failed miserably without a vote in Congress?

You’ve said this administration’s secrecy “on matters large and small is very disturbing.” In particular, you and other Democrats have criticized Dick Cheney’s refusal to be more open about his energy task force. Were you disturbed by your health care task force’s similar secrecy? How about your refusal to turn over subpoenaed documents for two years? Why do you tacitly support your husband’s refusal to release your White House correspondence from the National Archives? You’ve said the documents are being released on the Archives’ timetable, but your husband appointed his longtime henchman, Bruce Lindsey, to manage the release of such records. Why isn’t that disturbing?

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Jonah Goldberg

Jonah Goldberg is editor-at-large of National Review Online,and the author of the forthcoming book The Tyranny of Clichés. You can reach him via Twitter @JonahNRO.
 
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