John Stossel

America also has a different idea about failure. The Stossel Store was a bad idea. I lost money. D'Souza says that in other places, that would be evidence that I am a complete failure. I tried to make a profit, failed and so shouldn't try again.

That's the attitude in most of the world, says D'Souza.

"You say: 'You know what? I tried my hand at business. It didn't work. Now, let me take a salary job where I'll have some security."

He says that's not true in America.

"An American will start a company. It'll fail. Pretty soon, he's starting a newspaper, or he's now trying to export fish to Japan."

We know that Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, but Edison failed much more often than he succeeded. He had hundreds of failures. He was fired by the telegraph office, and lost money on a cement company and an iron business. Henry Ford's first company failed completely. Dr. Seuss' first book was rejected by 27 publishers. Oprah was fired from her first job as a reporter. A TV station called her unfit for television.

"There's something in the American temperament that says, 'Gosh, I lost seven times but that's OK,'" D'Souza says. "And I think that that's a resiliency of the American spirit."

It's one of several great things about America.


John Stossel

John Stossel is host of "Stossel" on the Fox Business Network. He's the author of "No They Can't: Why Government Fails, but Individuals Succeed." To find out more about John Stossel, visit his site at >johnstossel.com. To read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com. ©Creators Syndicate