John Hawkins

Only in today's political climate, where so much of the "civil rights movement" is comprised of bottom-feeding race hustlers and shameless liberals who deliberately exploit racial tensions for their own political benefit -- could anyone demean the real civil rights movement that occurred during the sixties by comparing the struggles those brave people faced -- to what has been happening in Jena, Louisiana.

That may not be the impression most people have gotten at first glance, but that's because many of the facts about this story have been distorted to such a point that they have little to do with what actually happened.

Let's start with what has been called the "white tree" and the nooses that you've heard so much about. Long story short, there was a tree at the school in Jena that white kids usually sat under. Note that I did say "usually." Despite what you may have heard previously, students of all races sat under the tree sometimes.

Regardless, a black student asked at an assembly if he could sit under the tree in question. The principal correctly told him that black students could "sit wherever they wanted." The day after that student and his friends sat at the tree, two nooses were hung.

Local pastor Eddie Thompson then does a good job of explaining what happened next to the students responsible for hanging the nooses,

"The actions of the three white students who hung the nooses demonstrate prejudice and bigotry. However, they were not just given “two days suspension” as reported by national news agencies. After first being expelled, then upon appeal, being allowed to re-enter the school system, they were sent to an alternative school, off-campus, for an extended period of time. They underwent investigations by Federal and State authorities. They were given psychological evaluations. Even when they were eventually allowed back on campus they were not allowed to be a part of the general population for weeks."

Why weren't they charged with a crime? Simple: because what they did may have been hateful, racist, and moronic, but as prosecutor Reed Walters has noted, it wasn't illegal.

I searched the Louisiana criminal code for a crime that I could prosecute. There is none.


John Hawkins

John Hawkins runs Right Wing News and Linkiest. He's also the co-owner of the The Looking Spoon. You can see more from John Hawkins on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, G+, You Tube, and at PJ Media.