Joel Mowbray

  The European Union could arrest Arafat and try him for crimes against humanity—but only if the master terrorist starts murdering non-Jews.  But that shouldn’t stop Israel from taking its own action.  What’s preventing the Sharon government from arresting Arafat and placing him in solitary confinement?  After a year or two of Arafat living in a ten-by-fifteen foot cage, charges of the intentional slaughter of innocent civilians could be brought against him.  At least in Israel, the murder of Jews still counts as murder.

  The only other viable option to placing Arafat in solitary confinement is the question more and more people are finally starting to ask: why not kill Arafat?  That’s not to say that that is necessarily the answer, but why is it not even a question?  In the words of Ariel Sharon, Hamas’ leaders are “marked for death.”  How is the man responsible for at least as many murders—directly through al Aqsa Martyrs Brigade and Fatah and indirectly by allowing attacks to occur—different than Hamas terrorists?

  And if the “international community” protests—which it no doubt will—Israel should simply point out that when the United States bombed Tora Bora in Afghanistan and the Baghdad restaurant before Operation Iraqi Freedom in a “decapitation strike,” the U.S. was not trying to injure or scare Osama bin Laden or Saddam Hussein.

  But one thing is for sure: if Israel threatens Arafat with his possible demise (behind the scenes—his reputation cannot be challenged publicly if Israel wants to respond appropriately), terrorist activity could quickly decline to its lowest level since the start of the intifada.  That would finally mark the kind of progress that Oslo should have sought.


Joel Mowbray

Joel Mowbray, who got his start with Townhall.com, is an award-winning investigative journalist, nationally-syndicated columnist and author of Dangerous Diplomacy: How the State Department Threatens America's Security.

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