Jack Kerwick

If the theory of “white privilege” is true, these black criminals are the real victims and those whites whose lives they destroyed were actually the victimizers, for in the absence of “white privilege,” these black rapist murderers would have been decent, law-abiding citizens.

Last summer, Delby “Shorty” Benton, an 89-year-old white, World War II veteran, was jumped and beaten to death by two black teenagers in Seattle.

If the theory of “white privilege” is true, then Benton’s murderers are the real victims and this WWII hero was the victimizer, for in the absence of “white privilege,” these thugs would’ve been decent, law-abiding citizens.

On Christmas Eve, 2010, in Houston, a 12-year-old white boy, Jonathan Foster, was kidnapped, bound, and killed by way of a blowtorch courtesy of a 44-year-old black woman, Mona Nelson. His remains were discarded in a ditch along the side of a road.

If the theory of “white privilege” is true, then Nelson was the real victim and young Foster was the victimizer, for in the absence of “white privilege,” Nelson would’ve been a decent, law-abiding citizen.

Last year, a 99-year-old white woman, Fannie Gumbinger, was greeted by a 20-year-old black male intruder in her Poughkeepsie, New York home. Gumbinger was subsequently murdered. Police say she died of “multiple injuries.”

If the theory of “white privilege” is true, then the black man who beat Gumbinger to death was the real victim and Gumbinger was the victimizer, for in the absence of “white privilege,” this robber and murderer would’ve been a decent, law-abiding citizen.

In my hometown of Trenton, New Jersey, back in 1992, black career criminal Ambrose Harris carjacked Kristin Huggins, a young, white female. Harris carjacked Huggins, and while she pleaded with him not to deprive her of her virginity, he sodomized her. While begging for her life, Harris put a bullet in the back of Huggins’ head and left her body in a shallow grave.

If the theory of “white privilege” is true, then Harris is the real victim and Huggins is the victimizer, for in the absence of “white privilege,” Harris would’ve been a decent, law-abiding citizen.

The 18th century philosopher David Hume remarked that many an absurd theory has taken refuge behind high levels of abstraction.

To this list we can add the theory of “white privilege,” surely one of the most absurd positions of them all.


Jack Kerwick

Jack Kerwick received his doctoral degree in philosophy from Temple University. His area of specialization is ethics and political philosophy. He is a professor of philosophy at several colleges and universities in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Jack blogs at Beliefnet.com: At the Intersection of Faith & Culture. Contact him at jackk610@verizon.net or friend him on facebook. You can also follow him on twitter.