Jack Kerwick

Messiahs are supposed to be bottomless fonts of wisdom and virtue. Messiahs are supposed to be more intelligent than everyone and anyone else. Messiahs are expected to prevail over all countervailing forces.

And this is all because Messiahs are expected to redeem those to whom they have been sent.

Just as Jesus’ disciples were paralyzed with shock when they saw their Messiah crucified, so too are Obama’s followers still reeling in shock from the sight of the verbal crucifixion that their messiah suffered courtesy of Mitt Romney.

Of course, because Jesus really was the Messiah, His glorious Resurrection was more than enough to vindicate the faith that His disciples had placed in Him. The reality, as opposed to the illusion, is that Obama, on the other hand, is no kind of messiah at all. Thus, rather than accept this, he and his followers have no option but to avail themselves of any and every means—however preposterous—that enables them to evade reality.

And the cold, merciless reality is that their candidate lost, and lost resoundingly, not because he was unprepared or disengaged. He lost because, for at least the first time since he has been in the national limelight, Obama had to square off with a man who is in every respect his superior.

Whether measured in terms of intelligence, worldliness, articulation, or even physical appearance, Romney outshines Obama by miles.

This is the ugly reality that Obama and his disciples can’t acknowledge.

Still, reality is persistent. It has a way of creeping into the consciousness. Things are only going to get worse for the One and his followers.

Obama will be more fired up during the next debate, for certain. But it will be to no avail. Romney can no more desist in overshadowing Obama than the Sistine Chapel can desist in eclipsing “piss Christ” as an artwork.

Illusions are beginning to give way to reality.


Jack Kerwick

Jack Kerwick received his doctoral degree in philosophy from Temple University. His area of specialization is ethics and political philosophy. He is a professor of philosophy at several colleges and universities in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Jack blogs at Beliefnet.com: At the Intersection of Faith & Culture. Contact him at jackk610@verizon.net or friend him on facebook. You can also follow him on twitter.