George Will

Adelson brandishes for a visitor a June 20, 1955, issue of Life magazine, the cover of which asks if Las Vegas is "overextended." The city then had fewer than 3,000 rooms. Today it has 138,000 and 45,000 more are under construction or planned. Although Adelson thinks gambling will remain this city's motor and scoffs at the notion of Las Vegas becoming primarily a "family destination," he does think it will become to Southern California what south Florida has been to the Northeast. What Northern winters did for Florida, California's government (high taxes, low performance) will do for Las Vegas.

Far from threatening Las Vegas, state governments, America's foremost promoters of gambling, have, Adelson says, "enlarged the market." State lotteries (and casinos -- 28 states have them) whet people's appetites for a trip to gambling's Mecca.

A long-running show at the Hilton here is "Menopause: The Musical." While the number of Americans over 65 has increased 20 percent since 1990, in Nevada the number has increased more than 100 percent. Poet Philip Larkin once said he would like to go to China if he could be home for dinner. Adelson and other makers of modern Las Vegas have obliged people like Larkin, sort of.

The Venetian has gondolas plying indoor canals that, unlike Venice's, do not smell: "Score one for the Americans -- when they rebuild Europe," Paul Cantor of the University of Virginia writes, "they correct it, they improve it, they get it right." Las Vegas' hotel casinos also include Paris, and New York New York. Las Vegas, says Cantor, "fulfills a deep-seated American dream -- to be able to pack the whole family into the station wagon and drive to Europe."

Frommer's guidebook suggests that there should be a Hoover Dam Hotel and Casino -- why drive 30 miles when you can see a replica on the Strip? This, says Cantor, is democracy -- giving the masses access to the world, albeit radically reduced.

Thanks to Adelson, Macao has its Venetian -- a replica of a replica of a city. So China has passed into postmodernism's erasure of distinctions between high and low culture, and between originals and copies, without yet achieving modernity. Buffett and Gates may still be richer, for now, but Adelson's achievements astonish and multiply.


George Will

George F. Will is a 1976 Pulitzer Prize winner whose columns are syndicated in more than 400 magazines and newspapers worldwide.
 
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