George Will

WASHINGTON -- The institutional vanity and intellectual slovenliness of America's campus-based intelligentsia have made academia more peripheral to civic life than at any time since the 19th century. On Monday, its place at the periphery was underscored as the Supreme Court unanimously gave short shrift to some law professors who insisted that their First Amendment rights to free speech and association were violated by the law requiring that military recruiters be allowed to speak to the professors' students if the professors' schools receive federal money.

Many schools that disapprove of the congressionally mandated "don't ask, don't tell" policy that prevents openly gay people from serving in the military have barred military recruiters from the same access to students that is granted to other employers. This provoked Congress to pass a law denying federal funds -- institutions of higher education receive about $35 billion annually -- to any school discriminating in that way against the military. The law exempts any institution with
a longstanding policy of pacifism based on historical religious affiliation."

Thirty-six law schools and faculties challenged the constitutionality of the law on the ground that "forced hosting" of military recruiters constitutes a "crisis of conscience" over compelled speech. They said they are compelled to communicate the false message that they support the "don't ask, don't tell" policy, and their hosting also subsidizes the military's expression of its view that openly gay persons are not suited for service.

(Do those professors object to public financing of political campaigns, which compels taxpayers to subsidize political speech they oppose? Don't ask.)

Monday's opinion was written by Chief Justice John Roberts who, during last December's oral argument, blandly said of the schools' desire to discriminate against the military, "You are perfectly free to do that, if you don't take the money." On Monday, Roberts' shredding of the law schools' arguments included a tartness that betrayed impatience with law professors who cannot understand pertinent distinctions.

The court has held that "judicial deference ... is at its apogee" when Congress legislates under its enumerated power to raise and support armies, so Congress could have directly mandated access for military recruiters rather than doing so "indirectly" with incentives -- conditioning spending on recruiters' access. And the law at issue, Roberts said, "regulates conduct, not speech. It affects what law schools must do -- afford equal access to military recruiters -- not what they may or may not say."


George Will

George F. Will is a 1976 Pulitzer Prize winner whose columns are syndicated in more than 400 magazines and newspapers worldwide.
 
TOWNHALL DAILY: Be the first to read George Will's column. Sign up today and receive Townhall.com daily lineup delivered each morning to your inbox.