Emmett Tyrrell
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WASHINGTON -- So far the telephone has not rung. Last week, I suggested a way for the left and the right to get together constructively. I suggested that the Rev. Jesse Jackson and the Rev. Al Sharpton might give me a call and we might unite in demanding an investigation of the death of Miriam Carey. You may have forgotten who Carey is. After all, it has been two weeks since her death. Two weeks of thunderous silence, after she rammed a White House barricade with her car and then drove off down Pennsylvania Avenue with a posse of police speeding after her. She was shot dead in a hail of gunfire at the end of the avenue two blocks from the United States Capitol. The House of Representatives gave the police a standing ovation.

I am not sure if that ovation came before or after word leaked out that Carey was a law-abiding dental hygienist from Connecticut. Eventually, it was divulged that she was also mentally ill. She suffered postpartum depression with psychosis after the birth of her child, a child who was a year old and in the back seat of her black Infiniti when the police penetrated it with bullets. How many we do not know, but the child was unhurt. Carey was dead at the scene.

Think of all the bizarre cases Jackson and Sharpton have agitated for, the Tawana Brawley case, the Atlanta killings of long ago and, just recently, the case of Trayvon Martin. Martin was shot during an altercation with George Zimmerman. That was indeed a tragedy, though not exactly an unavoidable tragedy. Young men get into fights all the time. Occasionally, one side or the other resorts to weapons. Surely in the Martin-Zimmerman altercation one side could have simply walked away. Carey did not get a chance to walk away. She was unarmed and clearly in distress. When the police surrounded her stopped vehicle, they could have waited her out. They could have shot out her tires. Surely some other means of restraint could have been employed. Instead, they apparently shot to kill.

Of course, the silence of the police is not the only silence. Thus far, not a peep has been heard from Capitol Hill, not even from the Black Caucus. Nor has the White House weighed in. When Trayvon Martin was killed in Florida, President Barack Obama had quite a lot to say. Rather famously he remarked, "If I had a son, he'd look like Trayvon." Why is the president not leading the call for justice for Miriam? Why did he not attend the wake for her in New York? It was Monday night.

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Emmett Tyrrell

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. is founder and editor in chief of The American Spectator and co-author of Madame Hillary: The Dark Road to the White House.
 
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