Emmett Tyrrell

In his interview, Reid serves up a tempting outline of his book -- watch it and my guess is you will want to read the book. Reid has made minor mistakes in his laborious work, for instance, calling Winchester College a university and saying the Welshman, Aneurin Bevan, was the administrator of Britain's National Health Service. Nonetheless, I shall say it here and not be ashamed: Though Reid is not a professional historian, he has rounded out the portraits of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Churchill, Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin more completely than any other writer I have read. Moreover, he does the same with lesser figures, George Marshall, Admiral Ernest King, Anthony Eden, in fact almost the whole cast of characters that lined up with Churchill to fight World War II. And I am not leaving out the idiot Dr. Goebbels and the fumbling Hermann Goering, Hitler's propagandist and air marshal, respectively. Never again will I perceive them in the one-dimensional way they come off in conventional historiography.

How Reid succeeds in this, I can only speculate. He has read widely and chosen quotes with an eye for their vividness. Perhaps he was unfettered by a professional historian's strictures and uses quotes with especial attention for what they will tell readers about, say, Churchill or Roosevelt. It is a gift, a literary gift.

We all know that Roosevelt was a great leader, but he could be inexplicably petty, even cruel. At the Tehran conference he insisted on keeping Churchill out of private conferences with Stalin for no apparent reason. Later he was much amused when Stalin, the butcher of Katyn forest, playfully bedeviled Churchill, causing FDR's friend, Averell Harriman, to recall later that the president "always enjoyed other people's discomfort ... It never bothered him much when other people were unhappy." Churchill is portrayed convincingly as tough and even ruthless, especially to his sorely pressed staff. Yet in Cairo, as he waited for an enthusiastic Roosevelt to join him in an outing to the pyramids, he told his daughter Sarah -- his "eyes bright with tears" -- "I love that man."

Both men had their fatherly embarrassments. Churchill was indulgent toward his repulsive and drunken son Randolph. He took him to international conferences and sent the unreliable fellow on high-level missions. Not to be out done, Roosevelt took his son Elliott abroad with him, and at Tehran had to sit by while the drunken Elliott gave a toast committing the American army to what would have amounted to atrocities. Elliott meant it as a joke, friendly to Stalin and aimed at Churchill.

It is rare to read a book that portrays one or another of these great men so completely and convincingly. To have so many great figures portrayed so fully in one book is amazing. Go out and buy "Defender of the Realm," and see if I am not right.


Emmett Tyrrell

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. is founder and editor in chief of The American Spectator and co-author of Madame Hillary: The Dark Road to the White House.
 
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