Emmett Tyrrell

Well, those getaways will not be quiet any longer. The Times has blown the whistle on the whole sordid deceit, and I anticipate we shall be informed of even more lavish recreations in the months to come. The Times and "The Washington Post" are nothing if not exhaustive and exhausting. Recall, if you will, the Post's extensive piece about Romney's high school bullying of a boy or the rumor of his bullying of a boy, or some Democratic acquaintance's recollection of Romney's bullying or, perhaps, someone else's bullying of the boy who, incidentally, is now dead and whose family objects to the Post's characterization of him.

Frankly, I think I shall stick with "The New York Times." For sheerest boredom, they take all cakes. What of Mitt Romney's other recreations? Doubtless before this election is over, we shall read all about them. We already have heard about how he treated his dog twenty-nine years ago. And then the Romneys have five sons. They may be windsurfers, as Jean-Francois Kerry windsurfed during the 2004 election. They may be bungee-jumpers. Was not Al Gore a bungee-jumper until he developed those multitudinous inner tubes of flesh around his midsection? On one subject I think we shall hear very little -- Mitt Romney's drug use as a young man. It is abundantly clear that he did not use drugs, not even caffeine.

On the other hand, President Barack Obama did use drugs. And he actually did bully a fellow high school student, though the student was not a boy. President Obama admits in his memoirs, Dreams from My Father, to having bullied a girl. Where did he get the money to pay for his drugs and why did he bully a girl? I shall never know. I read "The New York Times."


Emmett Tyrrell

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. is founder and editor in chief of The American Spectator and co-author of Madame Hillary: The Dark Road to the White House.
 
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