Ed Feulner

· In April, the National Labor Relations Board issued rules that shorten the time allowed for union-organizing elections to between 10 and 21 days. This hardly gives employees time to make an informed decision.

· States also can issue ill-conceived regulations. In September, the New York City Board of Health listened to Mayor Michael Bloomberg and banned the sale of soda and other sweetened drinks in containers larger than 16 ounces. “New Yorkers are apparently still allowed refills, at least for now.” Gattuso and Katz write. “No word on how many New York City cops will be moved from crime prevention to monitor the city’s soda fountains.”

· Last February, the Department of Health and Human Services released its mandate requiring that all health insurance plans include coverage for abortion-inducing drugs, sterilization, and contraceptives. There are no exceptions for church-affiliated schools, hospitals and charities whose religious beliefs forbid them to comply with this mandate. No wonder 42 cases with more than 110 plaintiffs are challenging this restriction on religious liberty as a violation of the First Amendment.

How can lawmakers help? They can start by requiring congressional approval of any new major regulations. And they can demand that these regulations have an expiration (“sunset”) date.

“As government expands,” President Reagan once said, “liberty contracts.” Keeping regulations under control is a very good way to ensure that doesn’t happen.

Ed Feulner

Dr. Edwin Feulner is Founder of The Heritage Foundation, a Townhall.com Gold Partner, and co-author of Getting America Right: The True Conservative Values Our Nation Needs Today .
 
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