Diana West

The National Catholic Register broke the most shocking cultural news of the week:

"A group of students at the University of Notre Dame has generated a campus-wide controversy by advocating that marriage between one woman and one man is better suited for children than same-sex 'marriage.'"

Welcome to campus controversy, 2014, where the subversives are traditionalists and, as we will see, the subversives control the establishment.

The Register continued:

"The group -- known as Students for Child Oriented Policy (SCOP) -- elicited negative letters to the campus newspaper and prompted hundreds of students to sign a petition calling upon the university not to recognize it as an official campus club."

What comes next may not be surprising, but it remains gasp-worthy: Notre Dame refused to recognize the group favoring what we now know as "traditional marriage" as an official campus club. Why? The administration offered a thin excuse, saying the new club would duplicate the mission of two other campus groups that promote Catholic doctrine -- one of which, it turns out, hasn't updated its website since 2005. Meanwhile, according to SCOP's prospective president Tiernan Kane, his group doesn't identify itself with a specifically Catholic mission, coming together instead as a non-sectarian effort to "focus on public policy as it relates to issues that specifically affect children."

The Register reported that planned club activities would have included "presentations on Common Core and Indiana education policy, marijuana's effect on young people's brains, the United Kingdom's anti-pornography policy and the problems associated with no-fault divorce." The club's position that traditional marriage is good policy is what drew campus fire.

There's a lot here, so let's take it from the top. First, we have just learned that on the campus of one of the leading Catholic universities in the country, the concept of same-sex marriage isn't just popular, it's entrenched to the point where it is controversial to prefer the traditional model -- even to argue that heterosexual marriage is better social policy for children. In fact, the belief that a child is better off with a mother and a father rather than two mothers or two fathers is so unpopular that 630 students signed their names on a petition to prevent it from being promoted as an official campus club.


Diana West

Diana West is the author of American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character (St. Martin's Press, 2013), and The Death of the Grown-Up: How America's Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization (St. Martin's Press, 2007).