Diana West

President Obama's recent speech in Brussels, headquarters of the European Union, reveals the chasm between what we have become and what we are supposed to be. Wearing his "Leader of the Free World" hat, Obama made the case against Russia's annexation of Crimea by conjuring a Manichaean split between free societies and dictatorships. But does it fit?

According to the president, there are free societies where "each of us has the right to live as we choose," and there are dictatorships where the rule is "ordinary men and women are too small-minded to govern their own affairs." Americans confronting government-mandated health insurance would do well to wonder exactly which society they live in.

Obama continued: "In many ways, the history of Europe in the 20th century represented the ongoing clash of these two sets of ideas." That contest, he explained, swerving wildly away from historical fact, was won "not by tanks or missiles, but because our ideals stirred the hearts" of Eastern Bloc anti-communists.

(Omitted was the fact that these revolts were mainly crushed without U.S. aid. Omitted also was the decisive role that President Reagan's "tanks and missiles" -- and missile defense -- played in the military contest.)

In this post-World War II era, Obama declared, "America joined with Europe to reject the darker forces of the past and build a new architecture of peace."

Russia's annexation of Crimea, in sum, is an attack on that "architecture," and, as such, is bad.

On closer examination, however, that same U.S.-EU "architecture" doesn't support the free-society paradigm so much as what the president calls the "more traditional view of power" -- the one that sees "ordinary men and women (as) too small-minded to govern their own affairs."

This latter view aptly describes the "soft" tyranny of the EU nanny state, whose early lights, after all, were Belgian Socialists and Nazi sympathizers with visions of a unified pan-European welfare state. In Brussels, their political progeny -- unelected bureaucrats -- increasingly dictate political and social norms across a "United States of Europe."

In the U.S., the medical totalitarianism of Obamacare -- not to mention Obama's serial usurpations of power (not enforcing legislation he doesn't like, making up and enforcing legislation he does like) -- makes it all too clear that this president has a dictatorial temperament.

This is unsurprising when you consider that his political baby, his engine of transformative change -- state-mandated health care -- happens also to have been an early program of the Bolsheviks, and had as one of its earliest U.S. boosters a noted Stalinist named Henry Sigerist. This seems like as good a moment as any to remind readers that the UN and the IMF, those leading institutions of globalist infrastructure, were fostered into post-World War II existence by a pair of notorious American Soviet agents -- Alger Hiss and Harry Dexter White. Truly, it's a Red, Red world.

Somewhere along the ride, our horse switched colors, also tracks. Until we figure out how and why and what it all means, that "free world" of ours is more or less a front.


Diana West

Diana West is the author of American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character (St. Martin's Press, 2013), and The Death of the Grown-Up: How America's Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization (St. Martin's Press, 2007).



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