Diana West

"Influence" can be an intangible thing, but sometimes there are signs. For example, someone, something, somehow managed to convince Director of National Intelligence James Clapper to testify before the House Intelligence Committee in 2011 that the Muslim Brotherhood was a "largely secular organization" without "an overarching agenda."

This is a laughable statement -- unless spoken in earnest by the DNI. Then the question becomes: Is it possible that in Clapper's chain of information there is, in fact, disinformation? Other questions Bachmann and her colleagues have concern the Homeland Security Department, where, for example, Mohamed Magid, head of ISNA, the largest Brotherhood front group, according to the U.S. government itself, also serves as a member of Homeland Security's Countering Violent Extremism Working Group.

Are there national security implications in the influence of Brotherhood front groups on Justice Department and FBI policies on terrorism? Bachmann & Co. want to find out. How about the ongoing relationship between domestic Brotherhood front groups and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC)? As Bachmann notes, this foreign bloc of 57 Muslim nations "claims jurisdiction over Muslims in non-Muslim lands, defines human rights as shariah, and advocates that Muslims not assimilate into the cultures of non-Muslims." What of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's decision to team up with the OIC to pass a U.N. resolution to restrict free speech deemed to be "defamation" of Islam? Such an effort flouts the First Amendment and also reverses U.S. policy. Could malign influence be a factor?

These five Republicans have also expressed concern over media reports that Clinton's longtime top aide Huma Abedin has family relations (late father, mother, brother) with ties to Muslim Brotherhood groups. Her mother, for example, reportedly belongs to the Muslim Sisterhood, a group the new first lady of Egypt also reportedly belongs to. Are such reports true? Do they have security implications? These are questions Americans have a right to know.

"For us to raise issues about a highly based U.S. government official with known immediate family connections to foreign extremist organizations is not a question of singling out Ms. Abedin," Bachmann writes. "In fact, these questions are raised by the U.S. government of anyone seeking a security clearance."

I'm guessing the bit about Abedin is the only piece of this complex story most readers have heard of. It has come to dominate and distort the response to a rational and patriotic effort to bring more transparency to government decision-making in order to ensure that it remains Muslim Brotherhood-free.

Why would anyone want to stay in the dark about that?


Diana West

Diana West is the author of American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character (St. Martin's Press, 2013), and The Death of the Grown-Up: How America's Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization (St. Martin's Press, 2007).