Diana West

Was the White House right? Opposition hasn't coalesced -- let alone any volcanic eruptions of good, old-fashioned outrage -- and that's putting it mildly. Thus, 130-plus days from the election, the New Party emeritus president has grabbed powers that not only tighten the already constricted job market for the American unemployed, but make mincemeat of the Constitution, trample national sovereignty and advance the erosion of our once-beloved English-speaking culture (the love that really dares not speak its name). Meltdown, right?

Nope. The only villain of the piece to emerge is Neil Munro of The Daily Caller, who interrupted the president's press audience (no questions, please) to hurl the issue of jobs for Americans (not for foreigners already illegally exploiting the U.S. taxpayer) into the mix. Off with his head, cried the prObamedia, echoes reverberating. To his everlasting credit, Munro's editor, Tucker Carlson, defiantly announced he would instead give Munro a raise. The echo-chamber narrative, however, was set. Obama did the right thing, "everyone" said, notwithstanding all that rude, right-wing "heckling."

Which brings us to this week. After House Republicans on the Oversight and Government Reform Committee took the unprecedented step of voting Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt of Congress for withholding documents relevant to its investigation of the Fast and Furious "gun-walking" operation, President Obama invoked "executive privilege," dropping the dubious mantle of secrecy over all the documents in question.

This time, House Republicans and media conservatives hit the roof. But what of the great national echo chamber?

It hit the mute button. The Washington Post, still brushing Watergate anniversary confetti from its hair, reported on Page A1 that this assertion of presidential privilege at the climactic moment of Congress' 16-month investigation simply "reignited a long-running Washington debate over the limits of White House power." In other words, ho-hum. The story sits low in The New York Times' online queue, with a headline winding up the perfect PrObamedia pitch: "House Panel Vote Steps Up Partisan Fight on Gun Inquiry." "Partisan fight," of course, is New York Times-ese for "heckling."

So is the president melting down or rising like a phoenix? For a socialist with dictatorial inclinations -- or is that a dictator with socialist inclinations? -- he's shockingly buoyant in the polls. Watch out, lovers of constitutional liberty: Unless We, the people, make ourselves heard, this rara avis could still take flight.


Diana West

Diana West is the author of American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character (St. Martin's Press, 2013), and The Death of the Grown-Up: How America's Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization (St. Martin's Press, 2007).