Dennis Prager

As South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley pointed out, one needs a photo ID in order to obtain Sudafed. One therefore might as well argue that blacks and other minorities are disproportionately denied the right to purchase Sudafed because a photo ID is required. The counter argument that there is no comparison between the two because there is no fonstitutional right to Sudafed completely misses the point. The Sudafed example does not argue constitutionality; it argues against the claim that great numbers of people will not vote if a photo ID is necessary. If few members of racial minorities have been prevented from getting a cold pill because of the need for a photo ID, it stands to reason that the need for a photo ID won't prevent blacks and others from voting.

The truth is that it insults the intelligence of blacks and Hispanics to claim that getting an official photo ID is too laborious, too demanding,and ultimately disenfranchising.

So, why is the NAACP going to the U.N.?

Because the wonderful fact of American life is that most American civil liberties and civil rights organizations have little reason for their continued existence. The NAACP, therefore, has to justify its existence. Which it does by manufacturing crises (and hopefully garnering media attention). Without major eruptions of racism, its raison d'etre disappears -- along with its funding.

That is the real reason something as utterly innocuous as requiring a person to show a photo in order to vote is taken to the United Nations. It gets attention and makes supporters of the NAACP think their money is being used for the greatest electoral rights battle in a hundred years.


Dennis Prager

Dennis Prager is a SRN radio show host, contributing columnist for Townhall.com and author of his newest book, Still the Best Hope: Why the World Needs American Values to Triumph.
 
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