Dennis Prager

For most of American history, a child who used such words was punished by his parents, and society instinctively knew how important it was not to expose children to obscenities. Today, adults in the music industry reward children for participating in videos laced with obscenities.

Nor is the nomination of "F--- You" as Song of the Year an aberration. Two of the other four nominees are rap "songs" whose lyrics are also vile.

Here are typical lyrics from the Eminem's nominated "Love the Way You Lie:"

"And I love it the more that I suffer

I suffocate

And right before I'm about to drown

She resuscitates me

She f---ing hates me

And I love it."

And later on:

"If she ever tries to f---ing leave again

I'ma tie her to the bed

And set the house on fire."

The third nominee is an ode to New York City, "Empire State of Mind," performed by black rapper Jay-Z and Alicia Keys, and which also contains the N-word. It is worth recalling that when white radio-show host Laura Schlessinger used this word solely in order to condemn its use in inner-city black life, society's elite poured such wrath on her that it forced many of her sponsors to abandon her, and she decided to leave radio. But when Jay-Z uses it, he is rewarded with the nomination for the highest award in the music industry.

Two examples of the N-word use:

"Say what's up to Ty-Ty, still sippin' mai tais

sittin' courtside, Knicks and Nets give me high five

N----, I be Spike'd out, I could trip a referee

Tell by my attitude that I'm most definitely from. ...

You should know I bleed blue, but I ain't a Crip, though

but I got a gang of niggas walkin' with my clique though. . . ."

For the record, the fourth nominee, B.o.B's "Nothin' on You," is another rap song with something of a melody behind it. This song has a decent message of a young black man who, though tempted by other women, only wants his woman. And the fifth nominee was a lovely song, "Need You Now," by the country music group Lady Antebellum.

How deep is the decay in the music industry?

According to the Los Angeles Times, these Grammy nominees were "decided on by about 12,000 voting members of the Recording Academy."


Dennis Prager

Dennis Prager is a SRN radio show host, contributing columnist for Townhall.com and author of his newest book, Still the Best Hope: Why the World Needs American Values to Triumph.
 
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