Debra J. Saunders
The feud between Sens. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., and David Vitter, R-La., doesn't have the import of the federal government shutdown, but it does shine a light on the Beltway's partisan rancor. If there is a lesson for Washington politicos from this mud fight, then it is this: Don't try to be clever. There will be blowback.

The story begins when Democrats were pushing President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, inserted language into the bill to require that Congress and staff get their health insurance through Obamacare exchanges.

Grassley's amendment didn't explicitly address the government's contribution -- about 75 percent -- toward its employees' health premiums, which is standard practice in employer-paid health plans. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and House Speaker John Boehner asked the White House to protect the employer contribution. The administration obliged.

Here Vitter saw an opportunity to seem more anti-Washington than his pals in the anti-Washington posse. To the dismay of staffers from both parties, Vitter proposed an amendment to require that White House personnel and appointees get health insurance through Obamacare and to do away with the employer contribution, leaving these federal employees to pick up the full cost.

Maybe Vitter thought that it was good politics to propose what effectively is a $5,000 to $11,000 annual pay cut for Capitol Hill staff members. But if I were in his shoes, I'd be careful walking around corners.

Next it was Senate Democrats' turn to be cute. Anonymous Democrats leaked tit-for-tat phony "draft" legislation to Politico's website. Manu Raju and John Bresnahan reported that Dems were considering three options, starting with an amendment barring the employer contribution to the health insurance of any lawmaker or staffer who a congressional ethics committee has "probable cause" to believe "engaged in solicitation of prostitution."

Say what? The story explained: "Such a hardball move could bring back uncomfortable memories of the 2007 'D.C. Madam' scandal in which Vitter's phone number turned up in a Washington-based prostitution ring. Vitter apologized for committing a 'very serious sin' but did not elaborate."

The second option would deny employer contributions to those involved in "improper conduct" that reflects badly on Congress, and the third would deny the same to lawmakers who voted for the Vitter amendment.

The prank shows why Rutgers University political science professor Ross Baker calls Politico "the bathroom wall of choice" in Washington, where "the Sharpies come out and the nasty graffiti are written."


Debra J. Saunders


 
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