Debra J. Saunders

Worse, the Office of Personnel Management didn't stop there. Its new proposed rule also would allow each member of Congress to "determine whether an employed individual meets the statutory definition" of "congressional staff." The OPM's rationale was that there is "no existing statutory or regulatory definition of the term 'official office.'" As if "official office" is an exotic cipher.

What do we pay these people for if they can't figure out what an official office is?

As a result of that brilliant maneuver, senators and congressmen will be able to exempt their staffers if they so choose. Capitol Hill, it turns out, is one colossal golden-domed exemption.

In pushing his amendment in 2010, Grassley rightly argued: "It's only fair and logical that administration leaders and congressional staff, who fought so hard to overhaul America's health care system, experience it for themselves. If the reforms are as good as promised, then they'll know it firsthand. If there are problems, public officials will be in a position to really understand the problems, as they should."

But there's this ugly reality on Obamacare Island: The rules do not apply to the people who make them.


Debra J. Saunders


 
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