Debra J. Saunders
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On election night, Obama had to hustle to find (now House Speaker) John Boehner's phone number so that he could make the obligatory good-sport phone call. So much for the Obama who promised to end hyper-partisanship in Washington and bring the country together.

Since Romney picked Ryan as his running mate, Democrats have tried to peg the GOP "young gun" as an inflexible ideologue who won't work across the aisle. Robert Reich dismissed Ryan as a social Darwinist. Others likened Ryan to the most extreme elements of the tea party or dystopian author Ayn Rand.

On Thursday, voters saw a GOP leader who hasn't been afraid to propose spending reforms, because he wants to fix what's broken.

As for Biden, he could only repeat 5-year-old talking points. Republicans, he charged, talk about the Great Recession as if it fell out of the sky, when "it came from this man voting to put two wars on a credit card, to at the same time put a prescription drug benefit on the credit card." Ditto the Bush tax cuts. "I was there. I voted against them."

Ryan did not counter that Biden voted for the Iraq War resolution in 2002 and the Afghanistan War in 2001. Biden did vote against the Bush tax cuts and the bad Bush Medicare Part D plan in 2003, but the Obama administration extended both the Bush tax cuts and Medicare Part D without paying for them.

It would be nice to see Romney make that point when Obama recites the same litany of woes.

Email Debra J. Saunders at dsaunders@sfchronicle.com. To find out more about Debra J. Saunders and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

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Debra J. Saunders


 
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