Debra J. Saunders
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While most reputable American news outlets did not report the rumors, The Washington Post's Howard Kurtz wrote at the time that reporters deluged the campaign with questions "about the governor's amniotic fluid, the timing of her contractions and whether she would take a DNA test to establish the baby's parentage." Those questions enraged the McCainiacs.

Palin's record as governor also went through the dirt washer. Palin wrote in her memoir "Going Rogue," "Suddenly I was a book-burning evangelical extremist sweeping down from the North on her broomstick." Factcheck.org felt compelled to report that Palin "did not demand that books be banned from the Wasilla library" and "has not pushed for teaching creationism in Alaska's schools."

Green laments that McCain/Palin didn't run "as mavericks," but instead "turned hard right." He doesn't seem to understand that the political press corps kept seizing unsubstantiated odd-bin tidbits to paint Palin as a right-wing kook and social-issues crusader -- and thus shoved Palin into the right-wing ghetto.

If a Republican cannot get credit for being a moderate, she might as well rush into the warm embrace of the GOP base. Like John McCain.

I do not absolve Palin for her post-campaign excesses. A stronger woman may well have withstood the barrage and -- after returning home and tending to state business -- emerged as a seasoned survivor. Instead, she resigned as governor to cash in on her role as the Republican whom lefties most love to hate.

That's on Palin. But when the media wonder what went wrong with her, they might start by looking in the mirror.

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Debra J. Saunders


 
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