David Limbaugh

I suspect that many of them have come to accept a large, "energetic' federal government and believe that Republicans should just accept it and instead devise original and creative yet "conservative" policy solutions within the big-government framework. In other words, we should throw in the towel on our founding principles, accept the liberal narrative that Reagan conservatism is extremism, and do the best we can within the new paradigm.

I certainly hope I'm overstating the case, but I've seen how timidly Republicans have operated on domestic and social issues when in power, and I've read the commentary of many establishment-oriented pundits about "compassionate conservatism" and similar tautologies.

Conservatives have been warning for years about the unchecked explosion of entitlements, runaway deficits and debt, the destructiveness of the welfare state, the enormous problems with federal control of education, the evils of socialized medicine, the growth-smothering effects of federal taxing and spending policies, the freedom-smothering metastasis of the federal regulatory leviathan, and the danger to the republic from unchecked, rampant illegal immigration.

Will Republicans, if they regain power of both political branches, have the political will to begin to unravel the nightmares caused by an abandonment of our founding principles, or will they just nibble around the edges with insignificant modifications because they no longer believe in either conservative principles or their ability to convince the people that our ideas are still superior?

You see, my real concern is not about impeachment. It's that too many of us have given up on the ideas that made America great -- other than to pay meaningless lip service to them. I'm worried that too many of us have given up the fight. We have watched as liberals have overtaken our cultural and educational institutions and successfully vilified the American idea -- even to the point that they have many on our side convinced.

Well, I'm not among those convinced, and I don't believe that the majority of the American people are, either. But I do think that we need leaders who will articulate conservative ideas unapologetically and that conservatives need to engage in the culture war and try to make progress toward reversing this illusion that limited government, capitalism and traditional morality are wrongheaded and extreme.

I just want us to get back in the fight. We face a tireless, relentless foe in liberalism, and if we're not up to the challenge, we might as well kiss America goodbye, irrespective of whether we win or lose the next few elections.

But I am praying -- and choose to believe -- that we can and will turn this around because our ideas are superior and the majority of people still instinctively understand that. But we need to begin acting and talking as though we believe it.


David Limbaugh

David Limbaugh, brother of radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, is an expert on law and politics. He recently authored the New York Times best-selling book: "Jesus on Trial: A Lawyer Affirms the Truth of the Gospel."

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