David Limbaugh

Former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell warned on "Hannity & Colmes" that what we really need to focus on with this Obama/Wright flap, are the tenets of black liberation theology and to what extent Barack Obama embraces them, assuming his pastor and church truly endorse this theology.

Blackwell said he is concerned this theology supports partial-birth abortion, pacifism in foreign policy, and economic socialism. He suggested that responsible voters have a duty to inquire whether Obama subscribes to these views.

As it turns out, Blackwell's observations are just the tip of the iceberg concerning this theology. If half of what I've read about it is true, it promotes anything but a unifying message. Instead of centering on God and his relationship to man, it appears to be unduly man-centered, race-oriented and more political than theological.

Rather than adopting Martin Luther King's colorblind approach, it stresses -- according to Anthony B. Bradley of Covenant Theological Seminary -- "an unqualified commitment to the Black community as that community seeks to define its existence in the light of God's liberating work in the world." The theology, says Bradley, "laid the foundation for many (black pastors) to embrace Marxism and a distorted self-image of perpetual 'victim.'"

Doesn't America have a right to know whether the leading Democratic presidential contender buys into the reputed theology of the church he has attended for 20 years? If Pastor Wright's Trinity Church doesn't teach this theology, Obama should have no problem telling us so. But if it does, he has much explaining to do.

It won't suffice for him to dismiss the inquiry with the same casual indifference by which he attempted to trivialize Pastor Wright's disturbing sermons as just a few remarks over 30 years condensed into a 30-second sound bite. Even a tenuous connection to black liberation theology undermines Barack's self-description as a unifier.

These disqualifying attributes of both Democratic candidates would ordinarily be enough to motivate and energize conservatives to new levels of commitment to the GOP nominee. But so far, John McCain, especially in light of his recent speech to the World Affairs Council, seems, except for a few remaining issues, to be doing his best to become the first Democratic president to be elected on the Republican ticket.


David Limbaugh

David Limbaugh, brother of radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, is an expert on law and politics. He recently authored the New York Times best-selling book: "Jesus on Trial: A Lawyer Affirms the Truth of the Gospel."

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