David Limbaugh

If I didn't know better, I would think liberal politicians and columnists were out to prove the thesis of my book -- that there truly is a war being waged against Christianity and Christians in the United States.

 Oh, yes, they deny it and attempt to turn the tables, saying it's Christians who are the belligerent ones, trying to take over the country and establish a theocracy. If it's not the New York Times' Maureen Dowd, it's her colleague Paul Krugman. It it's not them, it's John Kerry. They are all up in arms about Christianity and its influence in politics, governance and the public square.

 What are these people so exercised about? Why must they insist on demonizing Christians? Why do they fear them so? Why are they so paranoid about them participating in politics and government? Why do they seem to think that only Christians must keep their views to themselves once they are elected to office?

 Failed presidential candidate John Kerry said, "I am sick and tired of a bunch of people trying to tell me that God wants a bunch of conservative judges on the court." Just for the record, Senator Kerry, conservatives and Christian conservatives aren't saying they want conservative judges on the court, but originalists: judges who will interpret the Constitution according to the Framers' original intent.

 The war against Christians has intensified with the recent controversy over ending the Democrats' (nearly) unprecedented filibustering of judicial nominees. Senate Democrats and their enablers apparently see the Christian right as the main bogeyman in the effort to restore majority rule to the judicial confirmation process.

 They are especially upset with Senate majority leader Bill Frist for agreeing to participate in "Justice Sunday," an event organized by Christian groups to rally Christians to support politicians trying to end the judicial filibuster. Frist's opponents, from Ralph Neas, president of the People for the American Way, to junior Senator Mark Pryor, have registered disgust that Christian politicians and Christian groups would presume to approach this issue from the perspective of their Christian worldview.

 Before the judicial filibuster flap, it was the Terri Schiavo case. During that acrimonious, national debate, Dowd accused Christian conservatives of trying to establish a theocracy. Actually, she said, "Oh, my God, we really are in a theocracy." She also paid homage to the "credo" that "a person's relationship with God should remain a private matter." And, she compared Christian conservatives to Muslim "religious fundamentalists" in Iraq.


David Limbaugh

David Limbaugh, brother of radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, is an expert in law and politics and author of new book Crimes Against Liberty, the definitive chronicle of Barack Obama's devastating term in office so far.

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