David Harsanyi

Foreign accents and unique features can arouse curiosity in people. You have to develop an impressive hypersensitivity to believe that asking people about their background infers that "you're not a real American" -- whatever that means. But even if it were, so what? Why are we so distressed about the microhostility of strangers? Why do we have to be profoundly offended by every oblivious comment? Do dumb questions erect barriers to the progress of your community? More specifically, is there some conservative policy that aims to undermine the Asian-American experience?

Near the end of the piece we get to the real purpose of the so-called science. They don't like your tone. The authors ask: "What can the GOP do to win them back?" The answer, you will not be surprised to learn, is to be more liberal. There is no doubt that Republicans are perceived as the party of immigration restrictions (for good reason), and that turns off many minority voters. But it can also be argued that the GOP is also a party that is far more likely to celebrate and foster the merit-based success on which the Asian community thrives. (Though I should point out that making assumptions about Asian-Americans as a "model" minority is also considered microaggression.) And maybe one day the GOP will make that compelling case. But it's difficult to believe that the Asian-Americans, as the professors maintain, believe half the country is out to marginalize them with a bunch of subtle insinuations. In our real-world interactions we're just not that sensitive. We shouldn't be that sensitive in our politics, either.


David Harsanyi

David Harsanyi is a senior editor at The Federalist and the author of "The People Have Spoken (and They Are Wrong): The Case Against Democracy." Follow him on Twitter @davidharsanyi.