David Harsanyi
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The burst of new ads featuring Founding Fathers has prompted much discussion. "Marketing consultants," a Washington Post piece states, "say the ad is one indication that the movement's anger and energy have become part of the cultural conversation, making it a natural target for admakers."

Yikes. "Cars and freedom" are an indication that "anger" is driving a national conversation? Doesn't everyone think that cars and -- at the very least -- freedom are good ideas?

It's not surprising that animation and commercials are the most sensitive to public trends. It was the mild poke at religious fundamentalism by "South Park" that illustrated how dangerous religious extremism can be to free expression. "Family Guy" and "The Simpsons" regularly opine on sensitive areas of race, religion and culture that others never would dare touch.

Perhaps inadvertently, it was Audi's "Green Police" Super Bowl spot -- featuring law enforcement officials confiscating batteries and arresting enviro-scofflaws -- that most effectively poked fun at environmentalists.

It is a matter of time before concerns about liberty begin to filter into mainstream popular culture. The clues are everywhere; a remake of the greatest work of film in the 20th century, "Red Dawn," is under way, and so is a production of "Atlas Shrugged."

Is "Toy Story 3" part of that movement? Let me engage in a bit of wishful thinking and say: Of course it is.

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