Cliff May

Michael Ledeen and Thomas Joscelyn, my colleagues at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, have for years been connecting the dots between Iran and al Qaeda. Former CIA director James Woolsey, now FDD’s Chairman, also has long argued that Islamist terrorists, despite their theological/ideological differences, can and do engage in “joint ventures” to accomplish common goals.

Joscelyn has extensively researched this relationship. Back in 2007, he wrote: “No fallacy today is more misguided or more dangerous than the widespread belief that Iran, the world’s premier state sponsor of terrorism, and al-Qaeda are not allies in the terrorists’ war against the West. A corollary myth holds that Hezbollah—Iran’s terrorist proxy and the ‘A-team’ of international terrorist organizations—has also not allied itself with al-Qaeda.”

The terrorist attack that killed 19 Americans at Khobar Towers in 1996 was almost certainly an Iranian/al Qaeda joint venture. But the Clinton administration chose to shut down FBI investigators in the belief – misguided but widespread at the time – that more moderate Iranians were coming to power in Tehran and that publicly revealing the Iranian role would impede diplomatic efforts.

Iran also has been implicated in al Qaeda’s 1998 bombing of America’s embassies in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam. When federal prosecutors, that same year, indicted al Qaeda members, they specifically noted that al Qaeda had forged alliances with “representatives of the government of Iran, and its associated terrorist group Hezbollah, for the purpose of working together against their perceived common enemies in the West, particularly the United States.” And in November of last year, a Washington, D.C. court found that Iran had provided training for the al Qaeda terrorists at Hezbollah camps in southern Lebanon. The court stated unequivocally that the “government of the Islamic Republic of Iran…has a long history of providing material aid and support to terrorist organizations including al Qaeda.”

What about the attacks on New York and Washington three years later? The 9/11 commissioners said they “found no evidence that Iran or Hezbollah was aware of the planning for what later became the 9/11 attack.” However, intelligence obtained by 9/11 commission staffers just before the release of their report – too late for serious examination - showed what Joscelyn called “suspicious flights taken by the muscle hijackers. Some of the flights were routed through Lebanon, where Hezbollah is based and controls the airport. Interestingly, most of the muscle hijackers also transited through Iran en route to the United States.” The commissioners wrote: “We believe this topic requires further investigation by the U.S. government.” Such investigations have not been conducted – or, if they were, their conclusions have never been made public.

In the years since 2001, Iran has continued to cooperate with al Qaeda. In January 2009, Treasury designated four senior al Qaeda members who had received Iran’s assistance. Among them: Saad bin Laden, one of Osama’s sons. Joscelyn records that the young bin Laden “received safe haven inside Iran after 9/11 and was placed under a loose form of ‘house arrest’ in 2003 after he was implicated in al Qaeda attacks in Saudi Arabia and elsewhere. Saad and the other designated al Qaeda operatives were responsible for moving al Qaeda families, including some of Osama bin Laden’s and Ayman al Zawahiri’s closest relatives, to Iran after the 9/11 attacks. Saad subsequently left Iran for northern Pakistan, where he was reportedly killed in a U.S. drone strike.”

Last July, as Joscelyn also reported, “Treasury designated six al Qaeda operatives who use a network headquartered in Iran to move cash and terrorists. Iran, Treasury noted at the time, is ‘a critical transit point for funding to support al Qaeda's activities in Afghanistan and Pakistan.’” And in September 2011, the State Department designated a Hamas operative, Muhammad Hisham Muhammad Isma'il Abu Ghazala, linking him to both Iran and al Qaeda.

In recent days, Britain’s Sky News has been reporting that its “intelligence sources” have strong evidence that “Iran has been supplying al-Qaeda with training in the use of advanced explosives.” Sky News claims it has seen a “secret intelligence memo” describing “intensive co-operation over recent months between Iran and al Qaeda -- with a view to conducting a joint attack against Western targets overseas.” Sky News adds: “We do know that an operation is under way. We assess that the most likely target is to be European.”

In light of all this, why has there been so little public discussion of the Iranian-al Qaeda relationship? Two reasons suggest themselves: (1) Scholars, journalists and intelligence analysts who denied this association in the past are reluctant to admit they were wrong. (2) Knowledge conveys responsibility: If Iran is – and long has been -- married to al Qaeda, and if Iran is now just a few spins of a centrifuge away from acquiring nuclear weapons, it follows that strong measures must be taken against this growing threat.

That’s a message many Americans do not want to hear. It’s certainly a message many American leaders do not want to tell them.


Cliff May

Clifford D. May is the President of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies.