Cal  Thomas

UKIP also favors a flat tax and vouchers to allow parents to send their children to the schools of their choice and believes political correctness and multiculturalism have "split" British society, again mirroring conservative Republicans in the U.S.

While voter turnout across Europe was a respectable 43 percent, only 36 percent of eligible voters cast ballots in Britain. Local, or "off-year" elections, don't always forecast general election results, but sometimes they do.

Much of the British and American public -- and increasingly in the EU -- are beyond frustrated that politicians are not fulfilling their promises and seem more interested in perpetuating their political careers instead of doing what promotes the better interests of their nations. One sees that frustration in UKIP's policy positions.

Nigel Farage's challenge is to sustain the momentum he has clearly established into next year's races. His influence is clearly being felt as Cameron's post-election remarks sound increasingly more conservative. Cameron used the word "conservative" four times in a single sentence while being interviewed on BBC Radio. He pledged not to make any "deals and pacts" with other parties. That is hardly credible since Cameron currently functions in a coalition government with Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, whose Liberal Democrats suffered an election wipeout.

Voters will judge Cameron's veracity in next year's general election. If he doesn't measure up to his promises, UKIP could be Britain's party of the future, as might other conservative parties in France and throughout most of Europe.


Cal Thomas

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Cal Thomas is co-author (with Bob Beckel) of the book, "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America".
 
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