Cal  Thomas

It's doubtful any of the film's critics have seen the movie as it had only a one-week run last September in selected cities to qualify for Oscar consideration. A wider release is scheduled for this summer, but the secular left only has to hear "evangelical," "conservative" and above all "Christian" to set them attacking like rabid dogs.

If anyone cares about the film's plot at this point, the website Yahoo! Movies describes it as "...an alleged true-life tale from 1755 of two young sisters kidnapped by Native Americans after a raid on their family farm." The girls maintain their faith, which helps them endure and overcome their circumstances. The production company, Enthuse Entertainment, based in San Antonio, Texas, describes itself as making "God-honoring, faith-based, family-friendly films that inspire the human spirit to seek and know God." Given this parentage, it's a miracle the song was nominated.

The title song is sung by painter, author and speaker Joni Earackson Tada, a quadriplegic, who is known and respected among many evangelicals. Whether "Alone Yet Not Alone" deserves an Oscar should be up to the voters, not the Academy hierarchy. Whatever its merits, the title sounds more appealing than the 2005 Best Original Song winner, "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp."

Maybe the only bad publicity is no publicity. The controversy over this song has lifted the film from obscurity. Regardless, the Academy should restore the song's nomination because of the clear advantage in money, promotion -- and, yes, campaigning -- that other nominated songs have enjoyed.


Cal Thomas

Get Cal Thomas' new book, What Works, at Amazon.

Cal Thomas is co-author (with Bob Beckel) of the book, "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America".
 
TOWNHALL DAILY: Be the first to read Cal Thomas' column. Sign up today and receive Townhall.com daily lineup delivered each morning to your inbox.



TOWNHALL MEDIA GROUP